Behind the scenes! Mark 10:14 barbecue offers steaks, secret seasonings, and salads

Two+of+the+volunteer+grillmasters+work+on+searing+steaks+to+perfection%2C+while+a+Faith+Lutheran+volunteer+helps+with+gathering+the+grilled+steaks.+Multiple+people+work+to+get+all+of+the+meals+ready+before+people+start+arriving.

Courtesy of Cindy Seigle

Two of the volunteer grillmasters work on searing steaks to perfection, while a Faith Lutheran volunteer helps with gathering the grilled steaks. Multiple people work to get all of the meals ready before people start arriving.

Anna Grace Bricker, Staff Writer

Every year, the Mark 10:14 program hosts a homemade barbecue to raise funds for the program. This year, on February 27, the seventh annual Mark 10:14 BBQ took place.

Based on the Bible verse Mark 10:14, “but when Jesus saw it, he was indignant and said to them, ‘Let the children come to me; do not hinder them, for to such belongs the kingdom of God,'” the Mark 10:14 program at Faith helps children with disabilities learn.

The barbecue takes a long time to be made.

“(People) start cooking early in the morning on the day of the barbecue, around 8 am,” said Cindy Seigle, a Faith Lutheran Mark 10:14 teacher aid, via email.

Volunteers and workers prepare the salads and beans, while others apply a secret seasoning on the meat.

“The meat starts to cook on the grills around 11,” said Lee Segalla, a Faith Lutheran Mark 10:14 program teacher.

Most of the food, ready and cooked, gets taken right away. Families start arriving at 1 pm and don’t stop coming until 5 pm. A lot of people have to help out and get involved in the process to get the about 600 salads and beans ready and over 1 ton of meat cooked.

Many people help to prepare the food, in fact “over 100 people” work on the food all day long, said Segalla.

“The BBQ is made by the parents of the Mark 10:14 students and by many volunteers,” said Seigle, via email. “Some volunteers are Mark 10:14 mentors and some volunteers come all the way from California to help us.”

Even some former students’ families help with the barbecue.

“Clayton, who is one of our former students, grandparents and their friends and families come in from California and bring special grills,” said Segalla.

The parents and mentors sell many of the tickets and “the parents of the kids in the Mark 10:14 program work together to plan and shop and grill,” said Segalla.

All of this food doesn’t just magically appear ready to cook, it has to be bought.

“Leticia’s Mexican restaurant donates the salsa, and we get a lot of the food from the cafeteria people and Cosco,” said Segalla, “but we buy the food from everywhere.”

The food is cooked and sold in the gym parking lot.

Like many other restaurants, the Faith Barbecue also has a process.

“Special grills are brought in from California along with special (red oak) wood. The grill masters start the wood burning early, and then it is ready to cook by late morning,” said Seigle. “The meat is coated with a special seasoning and put on the grill.”

“We make a Santa Maria style barbecue from the central coast of California,” said Segalla, “it is a tradition to make that style.”

Not only barbecue is sold at this event though, but also baked goods.

“One of the moms makes brownies that are to die for and the living skills class makes cookies,” said Segalla.

Some people have had the barbecue many years and most enjoy it.

“This is the seventh year I have had the barbecue and it is the kind of food everybody like,” said Annie Seigle, a seventh grader at Faith.

Others haven’t had it as long.

“I have had the barbecue two times, [and it] tasted very good. I liked it a lot,” said Zoie Abdo, also a seventh grade student at Faith.

Most sales, including this one, have a purpose.

“The purpose of the barbecue is to, one, raise money to keep the program going, and, two, to increase awareness of who we are,” said Segalla.

Through the barbecue, the program tries to let people know what they do and this barbecue is a way to get this message through to many. Around 600 meals went home to families, so a lot of money was raised.

“The money helps to keeping the program going. Many people don’t know, but our students pay [the] tuition and a half, and there is a high ratio of teachers to kids, so the money helps with the instructional materials used for teaching,” said Segalla.

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