Preliminary Injunction

Judge delays Educational Savings Accounts

Linda Tayrien, Chief Financial Officer of Faith Lutheran, fills out paperwork. If the Educational Savings Account Bill proceeds, Faith Lutheran might see an increase in enrollement and an impact in the admissions department.

Jordan Pulse

Linda Tayrien, Chief Financial Officer of Faith Lutheran, fills out paperwork. If the Educational Savings Account Bill proceeds, Faith Lutheran might see an increase in enrollement and an impact in the admissions department.

Jordan Pulse, Editor

On January 11, Judge James Wilson issued a preliminary injunction (temporary delay) for the Educational Savings Account Bill, until the court case challenging this program gets resolved. This bill, which would supply up to five-thousand dollars for parents all over Nevada, was put on hold only weeks before tuition money arrived for these families.

At first, the government of Nevada issued the Educational Savings Account Bill as a way of having the public school students of Nevada have a choice on where they wanted to go to school. By passing this bill, Nevada would have supplied hundreds of qualifying families with funds up to five-thousand dollars. In order to receive these funds students would have to attend a public school for a minimum of one-hundred days and be under 18 years of age. Having an active military family or disability, could also qualify.

If parents were able to receive that money, they could use it to their advantage.

“Parents can utilize that money (from the state) to go to a private school, homeschool, online school, or even get individual tutoring,” said Linda Tayrien, Chief Financial Officer of Faith Lutheran.

However, this program has frustrated private school families, who haven’t received any money from the state so far. As a result, private school parents have started to enroll their children in public schools, hoping to receive financial support. Others in the community wanted to bring awareness by filing two court cases about this subject matter.

Overall, this program has already caused an inconvenience for some private school families.

“Nevada private school families are upset because they won’t be able to get their hands on money easily, unless they enroll their children in a public school for at least one-hundred days,” said Steve Buuck, Faith Lutheran CEO.

If the Educational Savings Account Bill gets rejected, life for public schools and private schools will remain the same. However, public school families who planned to use this money might become annoyed at Nevada for taking this privilege away from them.

The rejection of this bill can also impact Nevada.

“It immediately affects all schools who were going to take ESA monies from families and it directly affects all the families in the state of Nevada who were going to use that money to help fund their child’s education starting next month,” said Buuck.

On another note, if this program does go into effect, it will impact Faith Lutheran’s admissions. Considering Faith Lutheran’s limited space, this school won’t be able to handle that many more kids next school year.

Deciding who will and will not get accepted into Faith would become a slight difficulty.

I believe that the difficulty lies with the issue of a higher volume of applications. With more applications, we have the ability to increase the student body population but only where we have room,” said Joel Arnold, Faith Lutheran’s Head of Admissions, via email. “We will have to make a decision on how much growth we are able to handle at Faith in the upcoming years.”

However, this program would allow more talented students to attend Faith Lutheran.

“It will bring in some students who might not be able to attend Faith Lutheran without the funds provided by the program,” said Joel Arnold, via email. “Those students will bring gifts and talents to our school programs such as the arts, athletics, and other clubs and organizations.

Overall, this single bill can create quite the controversy; however, Buuck assures that the preliminary injunction isn’t anything unusual.

“The injunction is not totally unexpected. It’s part of the judicial process”, said Buuck. “Both sides will continue to work hard to build a case for their side of this issue.”

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