High school students complete first two online learning days on Sept. 14 and 15

The screen shown above is Moodle, the website where the high school students go  to take their online learning classes. During six total days of the year, students will go to Moodle to take their classes online, at home.

By Anna Grace Bricker

The screen shown above is Moodle, the website where the high school students go to take their online learning classes. During six total days of the year, students will go to Moodle to take their classes online, at home.

Anna Grace Bricker, Staff Writer

On Sept. 14 and 15, the high school students at Faith Lutheran High School did not attend classes on campus, but instead, attended school at home in the first of many online learning days.

Why these online learning days you might ask? Well, Mr. Scott Fogo, the High School principal explains the days.

“Basically, our graduates were telling us (or their parents) that they were not prepared for their online experiences,” said Fogo via email, “We take our responsibility to prepare our students for college very seriously and felt that six Online Learning Days were the least intrusive way to accomplish this preparation.”

In other words, these online learning days are to prepare Faith students for college and to get them ready to graduate.

For two days, Faith high school students got to be in charge of their own schedule and got to manage their time how they wanted. Most students agreed that the two days were very relaxing, and that they enjoyed having the flexibility of getting to take the classes on their own.

“The workload is no longer than a normal day, but it felt longer because students waited to do all of it at one time,” said Mr. Scott Fogo.

Some high school students said it was a good idea, and awesome to get to stay home.

How does online learning work? The student logged in to Moodle on their computers. Throughout the day, the students work through each of their four classes and watch videos and do worksheets in lessons that “the students’ teachers designed,” said Fogo.

Some students, such as Micah Fogo, a ninth grader, found their foreign language class hard, because the video was hard to hear and understand. Others, like Zac Abdo and Eddie Gentile, also ninth graders, thought that science and math were hardest. No matter what class challenged the high school students, most students mentioned homework, and lots of it.

“The work was twice the amount you would get in a normal class,” said Abdo.

Many students said that the homework took a very long time to complete, longer than the normal amount of homework. Fogo disagreed.

“The workload is no longer than a normal day, but it felt longer because students waited to do all of it at one time,” said Mr. Fogo.

All the lessons that the students took on Moodle, were created by the teachers. Teachers “planned great lessons” for their students, and some “underestimated how long doing the activities online would take,” said Fogo.

Below is a link that will bring you to a pdf of this stories layout:

https://mscrusader.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Online-learning-days.pdf