The library summer reading challenge now open

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Photo by Alyssa Staggs

Alyssa Staggs, Staff Writer

The Summer Reading Challenge, sponsored by Scholastic, began May 4 and will end September 4. Students in public and private schools read books and log in their minutes spent reading on a website to help their school win the challenge.

The Summer Reading Challenge is a challenge that has students involved in reading over the summer. This competition help students “to use their free-time wisely” according to Melanie Bowline, school librarian.

Students can enter their minutes by going onto www.scholastics.com/ups/campaigns/src-2015 and using the login information that Bowline handed out to teachers to give to students. Students can then log the minutes they have read for that day. The minutes go toward the school and helps Faith Lutheran to have the most minutes out of all the participating schools.

Bowline is very passionate about this challenge.

“The school would get recognized for the most minutes and overall, it would get the kids into books instead of on games the whole time,” said Bowline.

Bowline can track the people who put in the most minutes. The student who has the most minutes by the time the competition ends will win a prize.

“The prizes get handed out at the beginning of the school year when the challenge is over, also once I pick them out,” said Bowline.

The minutes that the students’ minutes benefits the school because then the school has a chance of winning the most minutes out of all the schools that participate. Last year the school with the most minutes, had almost ten million minutes.

Reading could help students’ education in many ways. “By reading books students won’t have a gap in their education, and then if they keep it up, it could go a long way,” said Bowline. Also, by reading students can increase their vocabulary and see many genres of literature.

Students are looking forward to this challenge.

“I might do this challenge because then I would have something to do when I have nothing to do, and it would also make me look good,” said seventh grader Virginia Wilkerson.

Some students say that they might not because they “will forget and also won’t remember with all the fun,” said sixth grader Matthew Cottom.

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